New AETC video reflects on the value of duty within the First Command

Tech. Sgt. Serenna Harmon, a Basic Military Instructor at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, pushes a flight of trainees as a film crew captures the action. Harmon was selected to participate in the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence’s newest Heritage Today video that focuses on Air Education and Training Command. Filming was conducted over two days around Joint Base San Antonio in early February and features a number of military and civilians in instructor and training positions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Christa D’Andrea)

Tech. Sgt. Serenna Harmon, a Basic Military Instructor at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, pushes a flight of trainees as a film crew captures the action. Harmon was selected to participate in the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence’s newest Heritage Today video that focuses on Air Education and Training Command. Filming was conducted over two days around Joint Base San Antonio in early February and features a number of military and civilians in instructor and training positions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Christa D’Andrea)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas --

NOTE:  This video was narrated by Technical Sgt. Raymond Santiago, a military training instructor with  the 340th Flying Traing Group, 433rd Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas.

“Every Airman bears a responsibility – not to self, but to our fellow Airmen, to our country. To ensure that when we hang up our uniform at the end of the day, the world’s greatest Air Force is even greater than before.”

These opening lines come from the Profession of Arms Center of Excellence’s newest Heritage Today video unveiled March 7, at the Air Education and Training Command’s Senior Leadership Conference held at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas.



The video exemplifies the importance of serving in the First Command.

“Airpower starts here in AETC,” said Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson, AETC commander. “Serving as a recruiter, instructor or in a duty within the command is a valuable and necessary step in any Airman’s career.”

More than 300,000 students flow through AETC annually, and are taught, led and supported by more than 60,000 Airmen and civilians.

“This is the command where you have the opportunity to forge innovative and agile Airmen and help them develop the necessary skills to excel in their profession,” Roberson said.

The Heritage Today series is designed to inspire Airmen through stories of Air Force heritage linked to current real-world Air Force operations. “The First Command – An Endless Legacy” is the second video to be produced featuring a major command.

Tech. Sgt. Raymond Santiago, a Basic Military Training Instructor, auditioned and was selected to voice the video.

“I have been a part of AETC for the last eight years and it has given me an opportunity to grow as an NCO and a person,” he said. “AETC provides Airmen the opportunity to develop and become better than you were yesterday.”

Santiago added that he has seen the impact transitioning civilians into Airmen makes and “this video captures the essence of who we are and what we can achieve.”

PACE is the Air Force’s formal commitment to institutionalizing professionalism to help develop Airmen who embody the core values. PACE initiatives include infusing professionalism into existing training venues such as First Term Airmen’s Centers and Squadron Officer Course; and delivering the affective instructional seminar “Enhancing Human Capital,” to ensure Airmen receive a continuum of professionalism development training at the appropriate touch points throughout their careers.

Each video in the Heritage Today series is linked to the core values and is designed to inspire and promote critical thinking and group discussion. The series is just one of the many tools PACE offers to help Airmen build strong teams and organizations that are centered on a foundation of commitment, loyalty and trust.

“I’m excited to lead a team of professionals dedicated to building these professionalism videos,” said Col Joseph Rizzuto, PACE director. “These tools will help strengthen our Air Force culture and develop Airmen to do the right thing, the right way and for the right reason.”

To learn more about PACE and access the available tools, visit here.