419th MDS takes training to Pacific

Tech. Sgt. Sydney Reed, aerospace medical journeyman in the 419th Medical Squadron, prepares a panda warmer while training at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The center’s labor and delivery section has roughly 10 babies born every day, and each one needs to be monitored, vaccinated and stabilized before meeting his or her parents. During her two weeks of Air Force Reserve annual training, Reed was able to use her skills as a licensed practical nurse to assist with more than 50 births, including two sets of twins, while embedded with civilian and Army personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

Tech. Sgt. Sydney Reed, aerospace medical journeyman in the 419th Medical Squadron, prepares a panda warmer while training at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The center’s labor and delivery section has roughly 10 babies born every day, and each one needs to be monitored, vaccinated and stabilized before meeting his or her parents. During her two weeks of Air Force Reserve annual training, Reed was able to use her skills as a licensed practical nurse to assist with more than 50 births, including two sets of twins, while embedded with civilian and Army personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

Tech. Sgt. Brandon Smith, aerospace medical journeyman from the 419th Medical Squadron, practices inserting an intravenous line into Abigail Trunsoco, a registered nurse at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The oncology department at TAMC features wall and ceiling art from cancer survivors in an area known as “chemo corner,” where Smith worked for two weeks during his Air Force Reserve annual training. After 10 years in the Reserve, Smith said he learned more on this annual tour than on any other, working with state-of-the-art technology and hearing stories that go along with the paintings artwork in the hospital. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

Tech. Sgt. Brandon Smith, aerospace medical journeyman from the 419th Medical Squadron, practices inserting an intravenous line into Abigail Trunsoco, a registered nurse at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The oncology department at TAMC features wall and ceiling art from cancer survivors in an area known as “chemo corner,” where Smith worked for two weeks during his Air Force Reserve annual training. After 10 years in the Reserve, Smith said he learned more on this annual tour than on any other, working with state-of-the-art technology and hearing stories that go along with the paintings artwork in the hospital. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

Master Sgt. Kevin Roper, medical technician with the 419th Medical Squadron, administers vaccinations at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Roper spent time preparing patients for procedures and assisting with administration while working at TAMC during his two-week annual training, honing his techniques and completing required medical skills refresher training. Roper also worked in the gastroenterology section where he worked with up to 11 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

Master Sgt. Kevin Roper, medical technician with the 419th Medical Squadron, administers vaccinations at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Roper spent time preparing patients for procedures and assisting with administration while working at TAMC during his two-week annual training, honing his techniques and completing required medical skills refresher training. Roper also worked in the gastroenterology section where he worked with up to 11 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Christina Judd)

HONOLULU, Hawaii --

More than 50 reservists from Hill Air Force Base’s 419th Medical Squadron completed two weeks of annual training at military installations across Oahu, Hawaii. The women and men took time away from their civilian careers to assist as medical, dental, optometry, and lab technicians augmenting three medical facilities that serve almost 40,000 military members and their families from the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps.

 

Working alongside medical professionals from other branches, the Utah reservists completed more than 80 percent of their required annual skills. The Airmen worked in wards and sections that gave them a broad spectrum of unique experiences, such as administering chemotherapy to veterans, practicing field medic techniques, and working in an emergency room. One Airman helped with the birth of nearly 50 babies, including two sets of twins.

 

In addition to serving one weekend a month, Citizen Airmen also complete two weeks of intensive training each year to ensure they are ready to deploy at a moment’s notice.