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433rd MTI provides training, leadership skills to AFROTC Det. 845

Master Sgt. Edward Rivera, a military training instructor with the 433rd Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, instructs AFROTC Det. 845 cadets at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, on military customs and courtesies.(Photo by Clayton Church, US Army Corps of Engineers)

Master Sgt. Edward Rivera, a military training instructor with the 433rd Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, instructs AFROTC Det. 845 cadets at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, on military customs and courtesies. (Photo by Clayton Church, US Army Corps of Engineers)

Master Sgt. Edward Rivera, a military training instructor with the 433rd Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, instructs AFROTC Det. 845 cadets at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, on proper military drill, ceremony, customs and courtesies, leadership, and teamwork.  (Photo by Clayton Church, US Army Corps of Engineers)

Master Sgt. Edward Rivera, a military training instructor with the 433rd Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, instructs AFROTC Det. 845 cadets at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, on proper military drill, ceremony, customs and courtesies, leadership, and teamwork. (Photo by Clayton Church, US Army Corps of Engineers)

JOINT-BASE SAN ANTONIO-Randolph, Texas – Master Sgt.  Edward Rivera, 433rd Training Squadron military training instructor at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, visited Fort Worth, Texas Jan. 11 to give Texas Christian University Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Detachment 845 cadets a close-up view of the magic beneath the iconic MTI campaign hat. The 433rd TRS is the only Reserve military training instructor unit in the Air Force.

 

“Most schools approach MTIs with visions of the classic image that folks associate with us, the tormentor,” Rivera said. “They quickly find out that we are equal part mentor and tormentor. Being a successful MTI is not about having a hardened personality. Respect for authority is a main objective, but MTIs must be flexible to adapt to the variety of challenges that occur during training as they mold civilian Airmen into tomorrow’s Air Force leaders.”

 

The AFROTC program has 48 small detachments nationwide. Det. 845 was voted the best small detachment in the nation for academic year 2017-2018 in academic performance, physical fitness and field training success.

 

Rivera said he was excited to visit the detachment to help spread the word that MTIs are available to provide mentoring for AFROTC units. At TCU, Rivera directed the cadets in basic drill movements in the same style used for basic military trainees. He also held a mentoring session with cadet leaders to provide them with essential skills to turn the civilians they lead into warrior Airmen.

 

 “I not only inspected the cadets, I also provided instruction on the principles of leadership that the upper classmen can use to train junior members and deploy later in hands-on management when they graduate, take their place in the operational Air Force, and begin  mentoring Airmen in the field to ensure the Air Force continues to Aim High… Fly... Fight-WIN!!!

 

Offered at more than 1,700 colleges and universities across the country, the AFROTC program develops the leaders of tomorrow by preparing students who are pursuing a college degree to also become officers in the U.S. Air Force.

 

The 433rd TRS, assigned to the 340th Flying Training Group at JBSA-Randolph, is a prime example of total force integration, as instructors operate side by side, cohesively and seamlessly, with their 37th Training Wing active duty mission partners to prepare approximately 41,000 enlisted trainees each year for military service.

 

If you want to help weave the core fabric that supports the Air Force consider becoming a reserve MTI. To request an application contact the 433rd TRS recruiting team at 433trs.recruiting@us.af.mil  or 210-671-2410.